AS&SH FORUM



Being the Official Discussion Forum for Astonishing Swordsmen & Sorcerers of Hyperborea™


Visit us at the HYPERBOREA web site!

You are not logged in. Would you like to login or register?

5/28/2018 7:00 am  #21


Re: Michael Moorcock

grodog wrote:

I read The Dreamthief's Daughter when it was first published, but hadn't re-read it until the past few months when reading it aloud with Henry (who's 10).  It was a real pleasure to read MM's more mature prose and sense of Elric's character---his anquish, his hopes, dreams, failures, and humanity came through much more strongly than in the original six novels/novellas. 

Allan.

It's a great story, and although Elric's presence is strong, it really is more of a Von Bek story. My only issue with it has been Gaynor's rapid rise to power. It seems to come out of nowhere, but I certainly like Dreamthief's Daughter a lot more than I liked some of the later Elric novels, such as Fortress of the Pearl and Revenge of the Rose.
 


Astonishing Swordsmen & Sorcerers of Hyperborea - A Role-Playing Game of Swords, Sorcery, and Weird Fantasy
 

5/28/2018 1:58 pm  #22


Re: Michael Moorcock

Fortress of the Pearl almost made me cry.  Having read all six of the original Elric paperbacks during my teen years.  When Oone says her last lines in the book.. I found that moment so heart-wrenching.  I would recommend to anyone just now discovering Elric to read the books in the order they are published, rather than their chronological order in-world.  Moorcock doesn't use a grand worldbuilding plan in his Elric stories, and thus, Fortress of the Pearl seems out of place when read after the events of Elric of Melnibone.  Indeed, the Dream-realms and Dreamthieves are introduced in Fortress, but are only expanded upon and revisited in the novels written afterwards.  Elric also develops as a character differently in these later novels (which, we have to consider that Moorcock wrote them fifteen years after he finished the last stories of the original Saga, which were written out-of-sync as well).  Fortress is a reintroduction to a newer development of Elric, and the books that follow are written in a more mature way, with the experience and perspective that only years worth of craft can give to a writer.


Behold! The Wizard.
Beware his powers!
UNSPEAKABLE POWERS!
 

5/29/2018 9:45 am  #23


Re: Michael Moorcock

Well, tastes vary, of course. Personally, I'm afraid I must count myself among those who enjoy the original 6 (collected) Elric books best, the collection with the Robert Gould covers. I finished Dream Thief's Daughter, gave it some thought, and decided I cared for it about as much as I cared for Fortress of the Pearl and Revenge of the Rose. I didn't hate it. It was just . . . okay. Too much dialog, too much philosophizing, not enough blood and souls for my Lord Arioch. It had its moments, certainly, which is why I kept reading. Hey, I understand and appreciate that the writer is older, has matured, and his tastes and outlook for the Eternal Champion have changed with the passage of decades. For me, I prefer Michael Moorcock's writing when it was less polished, full of energy, and punched you in the gut. 


Astonishing Swordsmen & Sorcerers of Hyperborea - A Role-Playing Game of Swords, Sorcery, and Weird Fantasy
 

5/29/2018 1:27 pm  #24


Re: Michael Moorcock

Ghul wrote:

Well, tastes vary, of course. Personally, I'm afraid I must count myself among those who enjoy the original 6 (collected) Elric books best, the collection with the Robert Gould covers. I finished Dream Thief's Daughter, gave it some thought, and decided I cared for it about as much as I cared for Fortress of the Pearl and Revenge of the Rose. I didn't hate it. It was just . . . okay. Too much dialog, too much philosophizing, not enough blood and souls for my Lord Arioch. It had its moments, certainly, which is why I kept reading. Hey, I understand and appreciate that the writer is older, has matured, and his tastes and outlook for the Eternal Champion have changed with the passage of decades. For me, I prefer Michael Moorcock's writing when it was less polished, full of energy, and punched you in the gut. 

​I very much agree there.  His early work reflects his creative energy at that time in his life.  Touring with Rock Bands, thumbing his nose at the Establishment, giving the finger to straights and squares alike.  Elric was a Force in those books.  There wasn't any time for deep philosophical dives.  Michael was writing a blood-feuled action-adventure with drugs and sex and a Metal soundtrack.

In the latter books, the reflection that he adds slow Elric down, and it doesn't feel consistent.  I think that's why we see a rise of another aspect of the Eternal Champion in Ulrich Von Beck and Ravensbrand.  There is a strong parallel (and whether that parallel is intentional or not, is unclear to me) between Ulrich and Ravensbrand, Elric and Stormbringer and their rivalry/enmity with Gaynor and the runeswords he covets and Yyrkoon and Mournblade.   

​Still, and keeping with the spirit of the forums, and most importantly how this all relates to AS&SoH, there remains a mountain of inspiration in Mike's work.  I'd argue that the deeper, more philosophical stories that he's written since the late 90s, would be a great reference for laying foundations to include the struggle between Law and Chaos, and the Cosmic Balance in a campaign.  Even if they're not the thrill-ride found in Sailor on the Seas of Fate or Bane of the Black Sword.

​Tanelorn is out there somewhere.  She exists in all places and times, I'd doubt that Hyperborea would be an exception.
 


Behold! The Wizard.
Beware his powers!
UNSPEAKABLE POWERS!
 

5/29/2018 1:35 pm  #25


Re: Michael Moorcock

Well said! His work has been fueling my imagination since it was introduced to me in the 7th grade. I've been fascinated ever since. I'm sure I will at some point continue reading Moorcock's more recent works, but I'm afraid I was left feeling a bit uninspired by Dreamthief's Daughter, likely for reasons we've already hashed out here.


Astonishing Swordsmen & Sorcerers of Hyperborea - A Role-Playing Game of Swords, Sorcery, and Weird Fantasy
 

Board footera





“Astonishing Swordsmen & Sorcerers of Hyperborea”, “AS&SH”, and all other North Wind Adventures product names and their respective logos are trademarks of North Wind Adventures, LLC in the USA and other countries. ©2019 North Wind Adventures, LLC.