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Adventures » Pulpy TSR Modules » 8/03/2022 10:48 pm

Carnby
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CB1 - Conan Unchained!; CB2 - Conan Against Darkness; and RS1 - Red Sonja Unconquered. I think you've about covered the rest, plus some that aren't normally considered astonishingly pulpy. Maybe some of the 2e adventures, though those tended to be very story-based and would probably need some work to make them fit, even beyond just Hyperborea-izing them. Some of the sample Jakandor adventures might work (although Jakandor would probably work pretty good with Hyperborea in general).

Rules Discussion » Fear and Horror » 7/23/2022 11:15 pm

Carnby
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I haven't played it or had copies of the books so I'm not too sure how they work, but 2e Ravenloft had rules for those specifically, you could probably borrow them though again, I'm not sure how much adaptation would be required. If you really want, the d20 SRD has sanity rules that originally came from Call of Cthulhu d20, but it'd be a bit more work to get that integrated with the Hyperborea rules. Quick and dirty, one could probably use the standard saving throw system to do it too, probably the best option if you don't want to add new rules.

Bestiary » Tourist Trap Monster » 6/30/2022 7:25 pm

Carnby
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Just a local celebrity statted up real quick for fun.

ALLIGATOR MAN 

"We lost Bertram in the Savage Boreal Coast. The fog had closed in and it was slow going through the swamp, didn't want to sink in the mud, you know? Bertram was part of the rear guard when suddenly the water roiled and a... man-gator burst forth. It sank its claws into the poor Frank and dragged him screaming into the water before any of us could react. Good riddance I say, bastard had it coming, but he went down carrying most of the food..." 

Large creatures with the back half of an alligator and the front half of a hideous humanoid. Some say these are distant relations of the mountain apes, adapted to the fog drenched forested swamps of the Boreal Coast where they lurk in wait for prey. A certain danger to travelers, they are luckily rare, preferring to lair far into the wilderness. Still, they are known to occasionally travel along the rivers, hunting the unwary travelers on those paths. Largely uncaring of treasures, they are known to strew gems and jewelry from their victims about their lair, letting the rest sink into the muck with the bones of their prey. 

Alligator Man: #E 1 (1d4)|AL CE|SZ L|MV 30 (swim 40)|DX 8|AC 4|HD 5+4|#A 2/1 (claw/claw)|D 1d8+1/1d8+1|SV 14|ML 9|XP 500|TC Q, R| Special:
Death Grip: If both claw attacks hit one opponent, an alligator man will grip its victim the next round, causing 1d8+1 hp damage per round as it sinks its claws into the flesh. An extraordinary feat of strength can break the alligator man's grasp, and possibly extreme damage can convince one to let go. While grasping its victim, the alligator man will attempt to retreat into the water to drown its prey before devouring it.

Bestiary » Daemons on the storm » 6/05/2022 9:35 pm

Carnby
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ARITOK (Storm Daemon) 

"I spent some time among the berserkers of the Barrier Mountains (ask not how I gained their trust), studying their ways. It was three months into my stay when a storm rolled around and all the tribe came out for their orgiastic celebrations. Sacrifices were thrown from the cliffs and they danced and cavorted among the crags and rocky slopes, their songs more beast howls than words. That was when I saw their god in a flash of lightning, looking down upon us from a ridge above with flaming blue eyes and the people saw it too, their shrill, ecstatic howls drowned by the roar of thunder that echoed among the peaks. Then there was a flash of light and a deafening crack as a congregant was struck by a bolt of lightning. By the time I blinked the glare from my eyes, the figure was gone, but I felt as though those burning eyes still stared into my soul..." -EC 

An aritok is tall, roughly humanoid if slightly hunched, and powerfully built. Its head appears as a lion skull with a few scraps of flesh and muscle attached and blue flames in its eye-sockets, its body is quasi-skeletal and loosely wrapped in bindings. Electricity crackles around it, and its claws are massive and sharp. Often content to remain distant from living beings they generally reside among storm-lashed mountain ruins exulting in the howl of wind, the crash of thunder, and the clatter of rock splinters blasted apart by lightning. Aritoka are honest to a fault and hate lies, and hold illusionists in particular contempt. Despite their lonely proclivities, occasionally one becomes the focus of worship for mountain dwelling folk, their power, honesty, and reclusiveness bizarrely making them ideal cultic figures among vhuurmis and lightning-addled berserkers. 

Aritok (Undead Type 13): #E 1|AL CE|SZ L|MV 40|DX 10|AC -4|HD 10|#A 3/1 (claw/claw/bite)|D 1d6+2/1d6+2/1d10+2|SV 12|ML 10|

Bestiary » Not one of the Monster Cereals » 5/26/2022 6:25 pm

Carnby
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MUMMY, MELLIFIED 

"I don't remember much of the days leading up to the event, I was delirious with Lemurian Swamp Fever and it was all a blur. I remember the cliff face tomb, the statues flanking the dark entrance overgrown with vines and beehives, and the echoing drone that followed us into the shadowy halls. Seeing the cadaverous man rising from his honey-filled coffin... had I not woken up the next day, my fever broken, a vial of miracle honey in my hands, and one of my guides missing, I'd have thought that memory was merely the dream of a sick man..." -EC 

Sometimes, when a priest reaches old age, their thoughts turn to the future, and their mortality. The most devoted have been known to sacrifice themselves, turning to a diet of pure honey until their death, whereupon they are interred in a coffin filled with honey. Eventually, preserved and blessed, the body is reanimated, undead miracle workers who demand sacrifice for holy cures. In combat they are wrathful, protected by the bees that inevitably make their nests in the tombs, coated in honey which catches and slows weapons, and their priestly powers are undulled by death.

Mellified Mummy (Undead Type 8): #E 1|AL LE|SZ M|MV 20|DX 6|AC 4|HD 7|#A 1/1 (pummel)|D 1d6|SV 13|ML 12|XP 1470|TC nil| Special:
Touch of Xathoqqua: A mellified mummy's touch can either cause Mummy Rot as a mummy, or it can cure disease as the spell.
Voice of Woe: With a command, a mellified mummy may shatter the will of its foes, and send pangs of fear into their hearts. Any creature of 5 HD or lower hearing the command must make a sorcery save, failure indicating it flees in panic (d6, 1-3) or is paralyzed with fear (d6, 4-6). The save is modified by willpower adjustment, if applicable.
Resistances: +2 to device and sorcery saves.
Immunities: Immune t

Bestiary » The Flying Dead » 4/26/2022 8:18 pm

Carnby
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Third of my pulp undead trilogy, the bat-ma... uh, the chatterer.

CHATTERER 

"We got a lead on where those bat-cultists had taken Ned and went to rescue him. We didn't know we were too late until he swooped down on us, with several other missing villagers. We lost a few before we escaped, but the worst part is I'm pretty sure they took Grimolf alive..." 

Made from victims of wicked bat-cultists, the chatterers are undead who have had a horrid procedure done on them while they still lived. The finished result is a hideous amalgamation of human and bat; thin and light; with blind, glassy eyes; large and thin ears; a mouth of wicked needle teeth; arms and hands warped into the wing structure; and their feet being twisted into cruel talons. They constantly chirp and make clicking sounds, allowing them to echolocate much like a bat. Their transformation has left them relatively fragile for their size and are unable to stand up to the battering that other undead might take, but their mobility gives them an advantage over common forms. Their preferred method of attack is to swoop down at victims with their talons, but if caught on the ground are reduced to biting at their foes. 

Chatterer (Undead Type 4): #E 1d6|AL CE|SZ M|MV 20 (fly 50)|DX 10|AC 4|HD 3(d6)|#A 2/1 (talon/talon) or 1/1 (bite)|D 1d6/1d6 or 1d4|SV 15|ML 12|XP 107|TC nil| Special:
Echolocation: Chatterers echolocate like a bat, giving the ability to sense even invisible creatures. Further, the incessant chattering can fray the nerves, causing those who fail a sorcery save modified by willpower adjustment to suffer -2 to attack and to further sorcery saves for 1d6 rounds. This effect can only apply once, no matter how many chatterers are in the vicinity. However, a chatterer affected by deafness will be effectively blinded, forced to the ground where they may only attack with thei

Sorcery » Lizard Man Suit » 4/26/2022 7:35 pm

Carnby
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Lizard Man Suit: A green, scaled suit including goggles, flippered shoes, and harness. Occasionally they are found with specialised tanks that can be attached using the harness set. The equivalent of leather armour, when worn the full suit allows a character (with a bit of practice) to swim for up to an hour without need for a Test of Constitution, with subsequent checks made at +1. With an attached tank, including a mouthpiece, a character may spend up to 4 turns underwater, breathing from the air supply in the tank.
XP 500; GP 1000
XP 100; GP 300 (Full Air Tank)

Bestiary » Blaeshund » 4/01/2022 11:27 pm

Carnby
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Another adaptation of a creature I've had lying around.

BLAESHUND 

"We thought we were ready for anything as we followed the scorch marks, round splotches that marred the stone of the corridor. We didn't give much thought to the ones on the walls, at least not until it came bursting through one, all blue flames and gnashing teeth. In the blink of an eye it jumped through Mildfrith as though she weren't even there, but she started coughing so hard she dropped her sword. Godomar wasn't so lucky. When it bit him it was solid enough, and it didn't just singe him either." 

Blaeshunds are incorporeal undead created through ritual sacrifice of a creature in fire, most often wolves or dogs which has led to their name. Appearing as a mass of swirling blue flames in the shape of the hound it was made from, and blackened bones can be glimpsed through the flames on occasion. When they walk, their footprints smolder, never breaking out into a fire but leaving scorch marks wherever they go. If not their originators, the Anglo-Saxon necromancers and pyromancers have certainly taken to their creation, using them as assassins and hunters. Undeath has given them a wicked, if animal, intelligence and they are, like the creatures they were made from, unnervingly good trackers still, and given their incorporeality they can be nightmarish pursuers, excelling in hit-and-run tactics and spreading fear. 

Blaeshund (Undead Type 6): #E 1d8|AL CE|SZ L|MV 50|DX 10|AC 2|HD 6|#A 1/1 (fiery bite)|D 2d4+1d6|SV 14|ML 12|XP 780|TC nil| Special:
Smoky Jump: As a charge attack, a blaeshund may opt to incorporeally pass through opponents (ignoring mundane, but not magical, armour and shields), dealing no damage but requiring a Death Save or be overcome with coughing fits as the lungs fill with smoke, suffering -4 to attack and AC and being unable to talk or cast spells for

Bestiary » Undead Treasure Guardian » 3/12/2022 7:30 pm

Carnby
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Thanks! I'd be interested to hear how that goes if your players encounter them.

Bestiary » Undead Treasure Guardian » 3/09/2022 4:22 am

Carnby
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A creature I had lying around, converted it over mostly to see how it worked. Since it was based on a REH story, figured it'd be appropriate here ("The Noseless Horror", for the curious).

BOX WIGHT

"When I opened the chest expecting gold and jewels, I didn't understand what I was looking at at first. Then I saw that glassy eye look at me and heard the rattling exhale and I realised it was leathery skin still marked with the signs of torture endured in life, a human body broken and bent into the box. And then it began to... to unfold itself as it pulled itself free of its cramped tomb, each movement accompanied by the popping and cracking of its joints and bones, arms and legs moving in ways a living man could not. Free of its confines it moved jerkily, like a puppet on a string and looked at us, its neck... pop, pop, crack, grind, as it looked at us one by one. Seeing it move so gingerly, we thought perhaps we might have an advantage in speed. But it wasn't slow. It wasn't slow at all." 

Box wights are treasure guardians and traps, the mummified remains of victims who, through a brutal and vile ritual involving a variety of tortures and ritual living mummification, culminating in the body being disarticulated and forced into a too small box. The thick, leathery skin of a box wight is tough, and is almost always marked with the signs of torture. They may be missing noses, fingers (never more than two on each hand, so as not to impede the effectiveness of their deadly claws), ears, jaws, toes, and genitalia, though never the eyes. Box wights remember their tortures and the pain of being put in the box very vividly. Unsurprisingly, for the brief moments they are loosed before they must return to their box, they savagely rip and tear at all living beings that had the misfortune of opening the wrong chest or attempting to make away with sacred treasures. 

Box Wight (Undead Type 7): #E 1d6|AL CE|SZ M|MV 40|DX 1

Hyperborea » Khopeshes and Rapiers » 2/01/2022 9:35 pm

Carnby
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BlackKnight wrote:

But even I have Limits... I don't think I'd be allowing any sets of Full Maximillian Plate armor from 15th century Germany... 

That said, a 15th century Imperial Knight going back to his family's robber baron roots now that he's free of Imperial oversight would make a fun enemy, with a great reward at the end.

I mentioned the shotel, I think it's a fun weapon that fits as a larger example of the falcata-type (I figure the larger Dacian falx would fall under this banner too). I'm thinking, essentially, that it's a bastard sword-type that trades the higher damage potential for more specialised uses, as it was effective in getting around shields and dismounting riders. Not sure about exact damage numbers, I've tentatively considered 1d6 (1d8 or 2d4) and considered mastery doing something, though I'm not sure what it'd do.

Shotel | WC 3 | 40gp | 5 lbs. | 1d8 (2d4)
-Ignores AC Bonus provided by opponent's shield (if any)
-Weapon has a 4-in-6 chance to dismount a rider on a natural 19 or 20 attack roll

As for where they come from, I assume falx-types are occasionally sported by Romans. If placing shotels specifically, with the culture that implies, I'd tentatively place them in the area between the Red Desert, the Lizard Coast, and the Black Forest. Less than a century ago (the second native-born generation is coming of age about now), a motley group of Ge'ez speaking, anti-Aksumite rebels arrived in Hyperborea while escaping a larger force. Without the Kingdom of Aksum to unite them, they have split into numerous small, bickering communities that largely survive on agriculture and mercenary work. Originally composed of Christian, Jewish, and Pagan elements, most have adopted the surrounding religions and have, since the founding of Larchmere Yys, quickly taken to the worship of Apollo, particularly in the northern territories. While currently still culturally distinct, these communities are quickly being absorbed i

Bestiary » Werestoat » 1/27/2022 8:54 pm

Carnby
Replies: 3

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Dragon #40 has stats for a wereweasel, along with some other interesting lycanthropes such as the pleasantly benign weresloth.

Hyperborea » Khopeshes and Rapiers » 1/18/2022 6:05 pm

Carnby
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rhialto wrote:

I think your other rule (about the rapier counting as just a WC1 weapon for two-weapon fighting penalties) balances out its 1d6 damage: easier to hit with, but still less than a long/broad sword in damage (aside: there is no mechanical difference between long and broad swords in Hyperborea).

Ah, that's reasonable, yeah.

Hyperborea » Khopeshes and Rapiers » 1/18/2022 4:07 pm

Carnby
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rhialto wrote:

The damage for the rapier seems a little high: 1d6 seems more "realistic", unless you're going for something more like an estoc?

I was thinking of that (I started with 3e where it's 1d6, I keep on being surprised when I don't see it in the OSR equipment lists to be honest, but then I look at the list in like, UA and realise they're not there either), but I based it off the rapier from the old free 2e Savage Coast book where they're 1d6+1 which, looking at the list of equipment, isn't really something that Hyperborea does so I figured it'd make more sense to go up one level (plus, assuming I did the math right, the average damage between 1d6+1 and 1d8 should be roughly the same?).

Edit: It makes some sense to me, they are precise strikes so I can believe that you're more likely to hit something good, though I could see that as being an argument for 1d6 and some kind of critical hit bonus.

Ghul wrote:

We do have a sickle sword, which is sufficiently a khopesh, IMO. Rapier would not be a bad addition. I've thought about it before. 

Hm, I have been slightly over-estimating the size of the khopesh as it turns out, though its description as a sword/battle-axe makes me think of it as a heavier weapon which is why I put it more in line with the long sword/battle axe. Plus I do like giving it a bonus to disarming attacks, but I just think that's a fun thing.

Hyperborea » Khopeshes and Rapiers » 1/18/2022 5:23 am

Carnby
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Didn't see them on the equipment list, and was a little surprised, but I assume they're around. My placements are tentative, I'm not incredibly familiar with the setting just yet.

I assume khopeshes would be Ixian weapons, given their real-world origins.
Khopesh | WC 2 | 30gp | 4 lbs. | 1d8 (1d10)
-Disarm attacks made with a khopesh are made at -2 (as a flail)

Not sure about rapiers, my feelings on their place in the setting is entirely based on Henry Kuttner's Elak of Atlantis so that seems like as good a place as any to start, and probably spreading out to the Greeks and other ocean-going cultures.
Rapier | WC 2 | 40gp | 4 lbs. | 1d8
-A rapier master fighting with a rapier in one hand and a WC 1 weapon in the other treats the rapier as a WC 1 weapon for purposes of "to hit" penalties.

Also considered the shotel, not sure how that would reach Hyperborea barring a previously unknown population transfer though.

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