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3/29/2014 6:58 pm  #1


Lin Carter

Among the great books that this man wrote are some gems such as Outworlder a well done quest involving a suvivor of a crashed spaceship who is called (Prophesied) to close a gate on the far side of a   fantasy type world.  With the aid of other companions also called to the quest, it is a rollicking sword and sorcery adventure.  Look for it at better used book stores wherever they may be.  On another note although he wrote a lot of sword and sorcery stories his mars stories are my favorites. starting With (The Man Who Loved Mars) there are three or four books set on mars. Check out goodreads to see at least a partial list of his books....  Aaron 

 

3/30/2014 6:34 am  #2


Re: Lin Carter

Thank you for the recomendations Aaron!

I've not read any of Lin Carters stuff, but i picked up one of his Thongor books some years back because the cover intrigued me (and it was dirt cheap). http://i60.tinypic.com/25tfh4y.jpg


Seems that he is sort of a divisive author though with some vocal fans, and others not liking his stuff very much. I know he has had a lot of influence as an editor aswell which may be the reason why some people seem to dislike him.

Like i mentioned i've not read him, and i would not want to step on anyone's toes, but i'm always curious about sword&socery writers and the history of the genre.


Níu man ek heima, níu íviðjur,
mjötvið mæran fyr mold neðan.
(Völuspá)
(Nine worlds I knew,the nine in the tree with mighty roots beneath the mold)
Realmsofmelpomene
 

3/30/2014 7:36 am  #3


Re: Lin Carter

Lin Carter's Thongor stories are entertaining.  Great literature?  No.  Fun stories?  Yes!  I have three or four of the books but I think I am missing a couple.  I might have to track those down as I did enjoy the ones I read.

 

3/31/2014 9:23 am  #4


Re: Lin Carter

I may have said this in another thread, but I think that the best thing Lin Carter did was his curating the Ballantine Adult Fantasy imprint. He kept some really good books in print--and commissioned some awesome covers. I haven't read any of his fiction that I like all that much. The Thongor books are fun enough, but I think Lin's real talent was as an editor, not a writer (or biographer!).

Hollis, Queens!

 

3/31/2014 12:01 pm  #5


Re: Lin Carter

Handy Haversack wrote:

I may have said this in another thread, but I think that the best thing Lin Carter did was his curating the Ballantine Adult Fantasy imprint. He kept some really good books in print--and commissioned some awesome covers. I haven't read any of his fiction that I like all that much. The Thongor books are fun enough, but I think Lin's real talent was as an editor, not a writer (or biographer!).

Hollis, Queens!

I can agree with this. I have to admit, a few months ago I started reading Thogor, and I put it down to read Merritt and K. Wagner, instead. Maybe I'll finish the Thongor book if I'm bored some time. It's entertaining enough, and fun, but I wanted something more to get the imagination and creative juices flowing. 
 


Astonishing Swordsmen & Sorcerers of Hyperborea - A Role-Playing Game of Swords, Sorcery, and Weird Fantasy
 

3/31/2014 12:34 pm  #6


Re: Lin Carter

Carter and de Camp both wrote nasty, hatchet job books "psychoanalyzing" much better writers - men they spent their entire careers ripping off.  That's tough for some people to forgive.  At least Carter was a decent editor (unlike de Camp, who was a total loss in my opinion).

I like the concept behind the Thogor stories, but as for the execution... well, as a writer, Carter was a pretty good editor.  In addition, calling anyone besides Conan "the mightiest sword and sorcery hero of them all" is a pretty brazen falsehood.

Last edited by Blackadder23 (3/31/2014 12:35 pm)


"The fear of death, its risk each time, is one of the most stimulating parts of the game. It therefore behooves the referee to include as many mystifying and dangerous areas as is consistent with a reasonable chance for survival." - J. Eric Holmes
 

3/31/2014 3:34 pm  #7


Re: Lin Carter

They live by their own code in Hollis.

 

3/31/2014 5:41 pm  #8


Re: Lin Carter

I must admit I liked the Thongor series as well.  I'm sure this will take me out of the running for preisdent or something.


"Faithless is he that says farewell when the road darkens,"
 

4/01/2014 6:29 am  #9


Re: Lin Carter

Hi All:

Wow this touched a nerve or two.  Okay I agree that he is liked or hated by a great many people, and that much of is work is derivative. But in the early days that is true of many writers, remember imatation is etc. I agree about de Camp, I could never get into him as a writer. The Thongor books I read as a teenager and though I could see that they were not as well done as Howards books, I drank deep of this new writer and all others of this type. Hell when I started reading this stuff it was lumped in as science fiction, and I had to go to the nearest big city and buy it at a pipe shop. So when a new book came in at 99 cents or less we inhaled them. I think that all books are a vast repository for ideas that we can use in our gaming and even the worst ones have had something I could use to trip my players up. So I can see where many of you are coming from. But I still stand by the books I set down in the first post as being worth your time....  Aaron

Last edited by Aaronhd (4/01/2014 6:30 am)

     Thread Starter
 

4/01/2014 8:37 am  #10


Re: Lin Carter

I could see how it could get lumped in with sci-fi. It's pretty much fantasy, but it has a lot of those "lost alien technology" elements that I enjoy. The Thongor book I have has a cover that features a sort of dragon chasing a spaceship, so it looks sci-fi. Actually, the ship on the cover doesn't look like the ship as described in the book, but it's still a decent concept. I read some of Carter's "Journey to the Center of the Earth" pastiche, and I enjoyed it more than Thongor, who seems to exemplify the big, dumb barbarian stereotype that Conan often gets lumped into, mostly due to Ahhh-nold. 


Astonishing Swordsmen & Sorcerers of Hyperborea - A Role-Playing Game of Swords, Sorcery, and Weird Fantasy
 

1/02/2017 12:14 am  #11


Re: Lin Carter

Carter admitted his work was derivative - pretty much pastiche of other authors/series.  Of course, he wasn't shy about promoting himself either.

I just recently finished reading The Green Star series of books and enjoyed them for what they were.  The wikipedia (shrug) article on Lin Carter notes the Green Star novels as (uniting influences from Clark Ashton Smith and Edgar Rice Burroughs).
Just additional fodder source to pull in to RPG adventures.  

I am only missing the last book in the Thongor series and then I'll run through those (I'm pretty much getting all his books in addition to the authors/works he is deriving from).

 

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